Biographies Research

Mary Wollstonecraft

Mary was the second child, and eldest girl, in a family of seven.

Mary_Wollstonecraft_by_John_Opie_(c._1797).jpg

Wollstonecraft’sΒ early years were spent, with her family, in following her feckless and violent father across England and Wales
In 1783, she helped her sister Eliza escape a miserable marriage by hiding her from a brutal husband until a legal separation was arranged.

The two sisters established a school at Newington Green, an experience from which Mary drew to write Thoughts on the Education of Daughters: With Reflections on Female Conduct, in the More Important Duties of Life (1787)

In 1792, she published her Vindication of the Rights of Woman,Β an important work which, advocating equality of the sexes, and the main doctrines of the later women’s movement, made her both famous and infamous in her own time.
Education held the key to achieving a sense of self-respect and anew self-image that would enable women to put their capacities to good use.

in 1795 Wollstonecraft attempted to commit suicide by jumping off Putney Bridge as her husband Imlay deserted her.

Mary Wollstonecraft was a radical in the sense that she desired to bridge the gap between mankind’s present circumstances and ultimate perfection. She was truly a child of the French Revolution and saw a new age of reason and benevolence close at hand. Mary undertook the task of helping women to achieve a better life, not only for themselves and for their children, but also for their husbands. Of course, it took more than a century before society began to put her views into effect.

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raygs01

Year 1 Level 4 student at Cardiff Metropolitan University, studying BA (hons) Illustration A blog to reflect on my progress

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